Right-to-Know


California Toxics Right-to-Know Law»
Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act»
Eugene Oregon Toxics Right-To-Know Law»

California passed the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act in 1986, after voters approved it in a Proposition 65 ballot initiative, so it is often called the “Proposition 65″ program. This precedent-setting law helps protect citizens and drinking water sources from chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm. It requires businesses to give warnings whenever consumer products contain these chemicals, either through product labels or notice to workers, and prohibits these chemicals from being released to drinking water bodies. It is the only state law in the country that provides consumers with this critical information, and required the state to establish one of the first lists of chemicals causing cancer and reproductive harm.

[Download]

Supporting Documents

Frequently Asked Questions Fact Sheet

This fact sheet by the state health agency answers questions for consumers and businesses regarding the chemical list, warning signs and procedures, and government and business requirements, and provides website links.

[Download]

Proposition 65 Chemicals List

California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment compiled the legally required list of chemicals which are known to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity, and is known as the Proposition 65 Chemicals List. This list featured in the Clearinghouse was added in 2007, and was done in 2005.

[Download]

Proposition 65 Fact Sheet

This fact sheet by the state health agency provides a summary of the law’s goals, describes responsibilities of businesses and government agencies, and highlights some accomplishments.

[Download]

The 1986 Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act is the federal law that established the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program and other important protections, such as chemical spill prevention planning. The TRI section of the law requires the tracking of toxic chemicals released into the environment, stored at facilities, or transferred in between facilities. In 1990, the Pollution Prevention Act added waste management and source reduction activities to TRI reporting. The primary purpose of the TRI is to allow citizens to access information on chemical hazards in their communities.

[Download]

Toxic Release Reporting Regulations

The federal Toxic Chemical Release Reporting regulations implement the federal law and detail the requirements for industry to report on their releases of approximately 650 chemicals to land, air and water which is then contained in the annual Toxic Release Inventory.

[Download]

Supporting Documents

Federal Report on TRI Use

This 2003 Environmental Protection Agency report, titled “How are the Toxics Release Inventory Data Used?”, outlines how the information has been used by citizens, companies, government agencies and researchers.

[Download]

Overview Fact Sheet

This Environmental Protection Agency fact sheet gives a brief overview for the consumer of the Toxics Release Inventory program.

[Download]

Environmental Group Fact Sheet

This fact sheet by the national watchdog group, Working Group on Community Right-to-Know, provides an overview of the TRI program, including its benefits and limitations, and lists useful resources.

[Download]

Report by OMB Watch

This 2005 report provided by the national OMB Watch, titled “Dismantling the Public’s Right to Know,” discusses the Environment Protection Agency’s systematic weakening of TRI and the need to strengthen and improve this valuable program.

[Download]

Success Stories

This 2006 document by the Working Group on Community Right-to-Know provides examples of how TRI has been an essential tool in alerting emergency responders, researchers, workers, public health officials, environmentalists, community residents, and federal and state officials to the presence of toxic chemicals.

[Download]

The Toxics Right-to-Know policy was adopted in 1996 as an amendment to the Eugene City Charter. The law provides the public with accurate and timely information about toxic material use by local industries.

[Download]

Supporting Documents

Fact Sheet
This fact sheet by the Toxics Right-to-Know Program provides information on the background, goals, general provisions, timeline and cost of the program.

[Download]

Summary of Law
This 2001 leaflet by Mary O’Brien, a community leader who led the effort to pass the policy, provides a summary of this precedent-setting law and explains its environmental value.

[Download]

City Agency Report
This 2002 report by the city of Eugene Fire & EMS Department provides detailed instructions for businesses on tracking and reporting their emissions under the Toxic Right-to-Know law.

[Download]


Print